CASE STUDY
HEARING LOSS DUE TO OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA IN TWO CHILDREN
Henryk Skarżyński 1, A,D-E,   Kamila Kordowska 1, B-C,E-F  
,   Piotr H. Skarżyński 1, 2, 3, A,D-E
 
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1
Department of Otolaryngology, World Hearing Centre, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing Warsaw/Kajetany, Mochnackiego 10, 02-042 Warsaw, Poland
2
Department of Heart Failure and Cardiac Rehabilitation, Medical University of Warsaw, Kondratowicza 8, 03-242 Warsaw, Poland
3
Institute of Sensory Organs, Kajetany, Mokra 1, 05-830 Nadarzyn, Poland
A - Research concept and design; B - Collection and/or assembly of data; C - Data analysis and interpretation; D - Writing the article; E - Critical revision of the article; F - Final approval of article;
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Kamila Kordowska   

Kamila Kordowska M.D. Department of Otolaryngology, World Hearing Centre, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing Warsaw/ Kajetany, Mochnackiego 10, 02-042 Warsaw, Poland, e-mail: osinska.kam@gmail.com, Tel. +48 793 736 258
Publication date: 2020-04-07
 
J Hear Sci 2019;9(1):35–39
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Hearing loss in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) typically begins in the third decade of life. OI rarely occurs in childhood. Case reports of hearing loss in pediatric patients with OI are considered as merely incidental, and until now pediatric OI cases have not been presented in the literature. Typically, hearing loss is conductive, but over time a sensorineural component also occurs. There are some reports of profound sensorineural hearing loss, but this type of loss is believed to be due to additional genetic factors. The two case reports described in this paper show how the hearing loss due to OI can be treated by means of stapedotomy and restapedotomy
 
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