REVIEW PAPER
FITTING OF AUDIO PROCESSORS IN PARTIAL DEAFNESS TREATMENT
Marek Polak 1  
,   Artur Lorens 2, 3
 
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1
Med-El Corporation, Innsbruck, Austria
2
Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, ul. Zgrupowania AK “Kampinos” 1, 01-943 Warszawa, Poland
3
World Hearing Center, ul. Mokra 17, Kajetany 05-830 Nadarzyn, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Marek Polak   

Marek Polak, Med-El Corporation, Innsbruck, Austria, e-mail: m.polak@ifps.org.pl
Publication date: 2020-04-20
 
J Hear Sci 2012;2(2):45–50
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Recently, cochlear implant (CI) eligibility criteria have broadened to include individuals with partial deafness, a condition in which, prior to implantation, a significant amount of low-frequency hearing remains. Cochlear implantation aimed for hearing preservation in partial deafness has been recognized as a new method of partial deafness treatment. However, it is not only hearing preservation that has a great influence on the performance of such users; it is also the fitting of the audio processor consisting of acoustic and electric part. In this paper the authors review results of recent studies that underline the importance of correct fitting of the audio processor in order to achieve good benefits in Electric-Acoustic Stimulation (EAS).
 
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