ORIGINAL ARTICLE
SPEECH AUDIOMETRY: NONSENSE MONOSYLLABIC LISTS IN MODERN GREEK
 
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1
Technological Educational Institute of Patras, Greece
2
University of Thessaly, Greece
3
University Hospital of Patras, Greece
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Nikolaos Trimmis   

Nikolaos Trimmis, 1 M. Alexandrou str, Koukouli, GR26334, Patra, Greece, e-mail: trimmis@teipat.gr
Publication date: 2020-04-20
 
J Hear Sci 2012;2(3):41–49
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Background:
The purpose of the present study was to develop a nonsense suprathreshold speech audiometry test for native speakers of Modern Greek. The specific aims were to construct phonemically balanced lists of nonsense monosyllables and to perform a preliminary investigation of list equivalence.

Material and Methods:
Nonsense monosyllables with possible CV, VC, and CVC phonemic combinations in Greek were chosen as stimuli. To examine list equivalency, the final recorded lists were administered monaurally in 5 dB increments to 40 adults (20 males and 20 females) whose hearing was within normal limits.

Results:
A nonsense monosyllabic speech audiometry test for speakers of Modern Greek has been developed. The test material consists of two lists, each of which contains 50 open-set monosyllabic combinations. The lists satisfied the criteria of equal phonemic balance, composition of Modern Greek speech, phonemic differentiation, and equal average difficulty. Statistical analysis of the results revealed no statistical significant differences among the lists at the 0.05 level.

Conclusions:
These findings suggest that the test is a useful tool for clinical purposes.

 
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