IS HEARING PRESERVATION COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION IN THE ELDERLY DIFFERENT?
 
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Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas School of Medicine, MS 3010, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160, U.S.A.
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Hinrich Staecker   

Hinrich Staecker, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas School of Medicine, MS 3010, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160, U.S.A., e-mail: hstaecker@kumc.edu
Publication date: 2020-04-20
 
J Hear Sci 2012;2(4):43–45
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Background:
Hearing preservation cochlear implantation has become commonplace, giving patients who are poor hearing aid candidates but who have significant residual hearing an opportunity to take part in the hearing world. Hearing preservation cochlear implantation has been extended into pediatric populations, but little attention has been paid to geriatric implantation.

Material and Methods:
Cochlear implant candidates with residual low frequency hearing implanted between 2009 and 2011 were studied. Pure tone average was evaluated pre- and post-operatively and plotted against patient age.

Results:
There was a statistically significant relationship between loss of hearing (PTA before and after implantation) and age.

Conclusions:
Hearing preservation cochlear implantation is feasible in the elderly but there is a slightly larger change in hearing. We review factors that may affect hearing preservation outcomes in the elderly

 
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