ORIGINAL ARTICLE
RELATION BETWEEN TWO SCORING PROCEDURES TO ASSESS AUDITORY MEMORY AND SEQUENCING ABILITIES
 
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Department of Audiology, All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, Mysore, Karnataka, India
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Ramya Vaidyanath   

Ramya Vaidyanath, Junior Research Fellow, Department of Audiology, All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, Mysore, Karnataka, India, e-mail: ramyavaidyanath@gmail.com
Publication date: 2020-04-16
 
J Hear Sci 2014;4(4):42–50
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Background:
Tests to assess auditory memory are scored differently, but there is scanty information regarding the effect of the scoring procedure.

Material and Method:
The current retrospective study compared two scoring procedures for evaluating auditory memory in 189 children aged 5 to 11 years. One scoring procedure was the original memory technique used by Yathiraj and Vijayalakshmi. The other was a modification calculated using the same data obtained by Yathiraj and Vijayalakshmi. The original auditory memory and sequencing scoring procedure required the administration of the entire test, while the alternate scoring procedure, that calculated auditory memory and sequencing span, did not.

Results:
A Pearson’s correlation coefficient between the two scoring procedure was calculated. Both scoring procedures showed gradual improvement with age. A significant high correlation was found between the two scoring procedures when the age groups were combined.

Conclusions:
Since the two scoring procedures provide similar information, it is recommended that, for individuals with relatively poor auditory memory and sequencing abilities, the span should be the choice of scoring. This would avoid a sense of failure when individuals are tested on the more difficult longer word-sequences. Additionally, it would make the test more time efficient. However, if subtle changes in performance across ages are to be determined, the original scoring procedure is recommended.

 
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