ORIGINAL ARTICLE
NOVEL COMPOSITIONS FOR MUSIC THERAPY OF CHILDREN WITH COCHLEAR IMPLANTS: PRELIMINARY REPORT OF AN ‘INSTRUMENTAL THEATRE’
Barbara Kaczyńska 1, A-G  
,   Katarzyna Godlewska 1, B-D  
,   Henryk Skarżyński 2, C-D,F  
 
More details
Hide details
1
Otolaryngology Clinic, Rehabilitation Clinic, World Hearing Centre, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Poland
2
Otolaryngology Clinic, World Hearing Centre, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Poland
A - Research concept and design; B - Collection and/or assembly of data; C - Data analysis and interpretation; D - Writing the article; E - Critical revision of the article; F - Final approval of article;
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Barbara Kaczyńska   

Otolaryngology Clinic, Rehabilitation Clinic, World Hearing Centre, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Mokra 17, 05-830, Kajetany, Poland
Publication date: 2021-12-03
 
J Hear Sci 2021;11(3):51–56
 
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
The aim of music therapy offered in the World Hearing Center is to accelerate rehabilitation and auditory development of people, including children, with hearing implants. The purpose of therapeutic musical activities is to shape and improve the patient’s overall auditory and cognitive development.

Material and methods:
The study was conducted on 5 children, aged 8–11, who had undergone cochlear implant surgery. The group was tested before the start of music therapy classes and after 3 months of classes involving novel music compositions called ‘Instrumental Theatre’. The classes incorporated special Active Music Concerts (for participation) and Passive Music Concerts (for listening). Assessment were done with a questionnaire tool called Prima Volta.

Results:
The results indicate that music therapy had a significant effect on the development of auditory functions, especially sound identification and auditory memory. Observations made with Prima Volta indicate that the children were much more engaged with music.

Conclusions:
1. Scarce academic literature and very few clinical resources indicate the need for further development of original music compositions for use in music therapy for children with cochlear implants. 2. For a more comprehensive assessment, the Instrumental Theatre program needs to be continued and the results assessed after 6 and 12 months of therapy.