ORIGINAL ARTICLE
FREQUENCY FOLLOWING RESPONSES IN ADULTS WHO CAN OR CANNOT SING IN TUNE
Milaine Dominici Sanfins 1, 2, A-G  
,   Ingrid Gielow 3, A,D-E  
,   Glaucya Madazio 3, A,D  
,   Francine Honorio 3, A  
,   Tatiana Bordin 4, C-D  
,   Magdalena Skarzynska 5, E  
,   Mara Behlau 6, 7, A,E-F  
 
More details
Hide details
1
Electrophysiology, Centro de Eletrofisiologia e Neuroaudiologia Avançada, Brazil
2
Hearing, Centro de Estudos da Voz (CEV), Brazil
3
Hearing, Centro de Estudos da Voz (CEV), São Paulo, Brazil, Brazil
4
Estatistical, Instituto de pesquisa Eldorado, Brazil
5
Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, World Hearing Center, Poland
6
Voice, Centro de Estudos da Voz (CEV), Brazil
7
Voice, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil
A - Research concept and design; B - Collection and/or assembly of data; C - Data analysis and interpretation; D - Writing the article; E - Critical revision of the article; F - Final approval of article;
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Milaine Dominici Sanfins   

Electrophysiology, Centro de Eletrofisiologia e Neuroaudiologia Avançada, Avenida Jacutinga, 220- apto 12,, 04515-030, São Paulo, Brazil
Submission date: 2020-06-05
Final revision date: 2020-07-09
Acceptance date: 2020-09-04
Publication date: 2020-11-16
 
J Hear Sci 2020;10(3):58–67
 
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Background:
It is believed that auditory processing occurs normally in people who can sing in tune and improperly in people who cannot. Auditory feedback seems to be a crucial factor in the way the voice is produced and monitored. Evaluation of auditory processing using the Frequency Following Response (FFR) allows fine-grained neural processing to be objectively identified and might be a way of differentiating between those who sing in-tune and those who sing off-tune.The aim of this study was to analyse the FFR responses of people who can sing in-tune and compare them to those who sing off-tune.

Material and methods:
FFR responses were recorded in 37 adults who were assigned to one of two groups: (i) a control group (CG) consisting of 17 adults who could sing in-tune (ii) an experimental group (EG) consisting of 20 adults who sang off-tune.

Results:
There were statistically significant differences in the electro-physiological responses of the EG compared to the CG for the latencies of waves A, C, D, and F in the right ear. In contrast, FFR amplitude measurements did not seem to be a suitable parameter for identifying changes in the coding of speech sounds.

Conclusions:
FFR responses in the EG showed a different pattern from the CG group, with a number of longer latencies in the EG. However, FFR amplitude did not differ significantly between the groups.