ORIGINAL ARTICLE
EVALUATION OF THE FREQUENCY FOLLOWING RESPONSE IN ITALIAN CHILDREN: A PILOT STUDY
Milaine Dominici Sanfins 1, A-B,D-F,   Stavros Hatzopoulos 2, A,C-E  
,   Thais Antonelli Diniz Hein 1, B,   Tatiana Bordin 3, D,   Piotr H. Skarzynski 4, 5, 6, D-E,G,   Maria Francisca Colella-Santos 1, D-E,G
 
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1
Child and Adolescent Health Graduate Program, Faculty of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
2
Audiology and ENT Clinic, University of Ferrara – UNIFE, Ferrara, Italy
3
Eldorado Institute, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
4
World Hearing Center, Warsaw, Poland
5
Department of Heart Failure and Cardiac Rehabilitation, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland
6
Institute of Sensory Organs, Kajetany, Poland
A - Research concept and design; B - Collection and/or assembly of data; C - Data analysis and interpretation; D - Writing the article; E - Critical revision of the article; F - Final approval of article;
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Stavros Hatzopoulos   

Stavros Hatzopoulos, Clinic of Audiology and ENT, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, 44100, Italy, e-mail : sdh1@unife.it
Publication date: 2019-06-30
 
J Hear Sci 2019;9(2):45–50
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Background:
Speech-ABR is an electrophysiological procedure that makes it possible to monitor the processing of auditory information in the subcortical region, easily and quickly, applicable even to very young subjects. So far there are no data in the literature describing the standards of normality of FFR in Italian children and adolescents. So the objective of the study was to assess the FFR in Italian children and adolescents with normal hearing.

Methods:
Twenty-four children and young adolescents, 12 female and 12 male, participated in the study. Their age ranged from 9 to 14 years (average 11.8 years). All subjects were Italian native speakers, right handed and with normal hearing. All subjects had normal behavioral and electrophysiological hearing thresholds. The speech-ABR recordings were acquired by a Biologic Navigator Pro (Natus, USA) with BioMark software.

Results:
The analysis for absolute latency of speech sounds (specifically for the syllable /da/) gave: latency (ms) (male/female) wave V (6.57/6.41), wave A (7.49/7.54), wave C (18.34/18.57), wave D (22.07/22.22), wave E (30.74/30.50), wave F (39.12/39.19), and wave O (48.06/47.88). For amplitude (µV), the responses were: (male/female) wave V (0.10/0.11), wave A (0.21/0.22), wave C (0.11/0.11), wave D (0.12/0.13), wave E (0.19/0.24), wave F (0.22/0.21), and wave O (0.18/0.09). Complex VA: Slope (male/female), 0.33/0.30; Area (male/female), 0.28/0.37.

Conclusions:
We found different FFR profiles in the 24 children to those reported in the literature in adult subjects.

 
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