ORIGINAL ARTICLE
BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENT OF CHILDREN AT RISK OF CENTRAL AUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDER WITHOUT READING DEFICITS
 
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Department of Audiology, All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, Mysore-06, Karnataka, India
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Prawin Kumar   

Prawin Kumar, Lecturer in Audiology, Department of Audiology, All India Institute of Speech and Hearing, Manasagangothri, Mysore-570006, Karnataka, India, Phone No: +91 9886833741, Fax: +91821 2510515, e-mail: prawin_audio@rediffmail.com
Publication date: 2020-04-17
 
J Hear Sci 2013;3(4):49–55
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Background:
Auditory processing abilities in children with dyslexia and reading disabilities have been widely studied using various behavioral and electrophysiological measures. However explorations in children with (C)APD without reading disability are lacking, and the present study was designed to fill that gap.

Material and Methods:
The study comprised an experimental group and a control group, the former having 15 children at risk of (C)APD without reading difficulties and the latter 15 typically developing children. Behavioral tests for (C)APD were administered to participants in both groups, and included the gap detection test (GDT), pitch pattern test (PPT), dichotic consonant vowel test (DCV), speech perception in noise (SPIN), and masking level difference (MLD) test.

Results:
Children who were at risk of (C)APD without reading deficit displayed higher thresholds in GDT and gained poorer scores on PPT as well as SPIN when compared to the group of typically developing children. However, the performance on MLD and DCV were comparable between the groups.

Conclusions:
The present study suggests a combination of GDT, PPT, and SPIN as a possible sensitive tool in clinics for indicating central auditory deficits in children at risk of (C)APD without reading deficits. DCV and MLD were not sensitive.

 
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