ONE-YEAR FOLLOW-UP RESULTS OF YOUNG CHILDREN SWITCHED-ON WITH HIRES 120™
 
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1
University Clinic, Warsaw, Poland
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Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel
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Federal State Scientific Clinical Centre of Otorhinolaryngology, Ufa department, Russia
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Klinikum der J.W. Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt, Germany
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Hospital Clinico San Cecilio, Granada, Spain
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Madras ENT Research Foundation, Chennai, India
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KEM Hospital and Research Center, Pune, India
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Universitaets-Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Klinik Essen, Essen, Germany
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Advanced Bionics, Rixheim, France
Publication date: 2020-04-20
 
J Hear Sci 2011;1(2):67–69
 
ABSTRACT
Background:
The HiRes 120™ sound coding strategy from Advanced Bionics™ implements virtual channels by steering current between two adjacent electrodes. In this way the number of stimulation sites is no longer limited to 16, the same as the number of electrode contacts but may be extended to 120 locations which correspond to 120 spectral bands. The aim of this project was to evaluate the benefit of the HiRes 120 sound coding strategy for speech production, perception and music development over a 24 month period in children.

Materials and Methods:
Children between twelve months and four years of age are included in the evaluation. All subjects are first fitted with HiRes 120 using either their Harmony™ or Platinum Sound™ processors. Pre-implantation, baseline is evaluated using the Children’s Implant Profile (Nottingham Version) and a free field audiogram if available. The children are evaluated with a series of questionnaires: MUSS, (IT)MAIS, SIR, CAP, PRISE and a Musical Stages Profile at approximately 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. Performance data using the clinic’s routine tests are collected.

Results:
40 subjects from 8 centres were included in the survey. The data obtained so far up to 12 months showed a clear increase of the scores from session to session for all the questionnaires. In addition, most children were within the normal hearing range for the (IT)MAIS and PRISE questionnaires.

Conclusions:
Data collection is ongoing; the first outcomes are very promising in terms of acceptance and performance with HiRes 120.

 
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