ORIGINAL ARTICLE
DEVELOPMENT AND STANDARDISATION OF HIGH FREQUENCY WORD IDENTIFICATION TEST FOR ADULTS IN GUJARATI LANGUAGE
Gunjan Mehta 1, A-F  
,  
 
 
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Department of Audiology and Speech Therapy, C.U. Shah Medical College and Hospital, Surendranagar, Gujarat, India
A - Research concept and design; B - Collection and/or assembly of data; C - Data analysis and interpretation; D - Writing the article; E - Critical revision of the article; F - Final approval of article;
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Gunjan Mehta   

Gunjan Mehta, Department of Audiology and Speech Therapy, C.U. Shah Medical College and Hospital, Surendranagar 363001, Gujarat, India. Email: gunjanmehta06@gmail.com; Phone: +91 9664952636
Publication date: 2020-04-08
 
J Hear Sci 2019;9(4):25–30
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Background:
Evaluation of an individual’s hearing involves administering a test battery, and these assessments collectively complement each other in defining the degree, type, and configuration of hearing loss. Among the acoustic stimuli used in such tests, speech signals are the most complex and possess significant redundancy. Therefore the use of conventional word lists during routine audiological evaluation may, through redundant information, lead to overestimation of the performance of individuals with high-frequency sloping hearing loss. The Gujarati language, with 56 million native speakers in India, currently has only a conventional speech identification test. The present study aimed at developing and standardizing high-frequency word lists in Gujarati.

Material and Methods:
The study was conducted in three phases. Phase I: development of high-frequency word lists in Gujarati. Phase II: establishment of norms for the developed word lists on 180 normal hearing individuals belonging to different geographic regions of Gujarat. Phase III: Checking the applicability on 25 individuals with high-frequency sloping hearing loss and 25 individuals with flat frequency hearing loss.

Results:
A Shapiro–Wilks test revealed a normal distribution. One-way ANOVA revealed no significant difference between the scores obtained from the two high-frequency word lists. There was a significant difference in mean speech identification scores (SIS) for individuals with high-frequency sloping hearing loss in which use of conventional word lists gave a mean score of 77% while use of the high-frequency word lists gave a mean score of 53%.

Conclusions:
Two high-frequency word lists each of 25 words were developed. The word lists were found to be reliable, equally difficult, interchangeable, and effective in detecting communication difficulties due to high-frequency sloping hearing loss.

 
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